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Dive Pioneers: A Personal Voyage

By John Christopher Fine When John Cronin was celebrated for his pioneering work as one of the founders...

PUNK No. 999,999

Article By John Christopher Fine  Veteran Scuba Instructor and Course Director Fred Calhoun’s remark, made more than forty years...

KEY LARGO AND VICINITY AFTER HURRICANE IRMA

By John Christopher Fine “Yeah, that’s right. I want more.” Famous lines spoken by Rocco in a classic film...

HOW IMPORTANT IS OUR OCEAN

The images capture the effects of coral bleaching and the algae choking the coral. Another photo shows pesticide application warning right a near storm drain that leads directly into the Intracoastal Waterway and then at tide change into the Atlantic Ocean

INTO THE DEEP

Article & Photos By John Christopher Fine  The marina was quiet when I...

DIVE SHOPS AND A DIVER’S NEEDS

Article & Photos By John Christopher Fine  John Shouk operated Cougar Sports in New...

HISTORY OF DIVING MUSEUM UNDAMAGED AFTER HURRICANE IRMA

Two physicians from Ohio, a husband and wife team, began scuba diving, raising tropical fish, studying fish behavior and ocean environmental issues. Their interest evolved into man’s penetration of the undersea. Drs. Joe and Sally Bauer researched then collected early diving inventions and historic hard hat rigs. Their collection expanded as they discovered and preserved historic diving gear, books, manuscripts and memorabilia associated with ocean exploration. Collecting historic dive equipment became their passion.

I LOVE MY FISH

Article & Photos By John Christopher Fine Diana Lyn McNamara shares her passion for art and fish

Florida’s Treasure Express

“Florida is the epicenter for sunken Spanish treasure galleons.” That was the mantra of the late Bob ‘Frogfoot’ Weller. Bob and Margaret Weller searched off Florida’s coast for forty years. Their discoveries rivaled those of Mel Fisher with whom they worked and shared close friendship. Frogfoot was always successful. He knew Florida’s underwater bounty can never be exhausted. Furious hurricanes wrecked about ten percent of Spanish colonial shipping. Centuries of wind, waves and storms in the Atlantic scattered this wreckage over miles of ocean. It will never all be found.

Islamorada and the Middle-Keys after Hurricane Irma

Joanne Birdsall, Gift Store Manager at the History of Diving Museum (HDM) in Islamorada, took out her phone. She scrolled down to show me photographs along US 1, known in the Florida Keys as the Overseas Highway. Her shots were taken after residents were allowed back and clean-up started in the wake of Hurricane Irma. Irma was a category 5 hurricane with sustained winds of peak intensity measured at 185 miles per hour.
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