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The Human Diver Project: “Counter-Errorism”

“To err is to be human”, as the old axiom goes. When coupled with an intense skill-based activity such as scuba diving, human error can make the difference between safety and injury; in many cases, between life and death. Recognizing human fallibility and how to meet and overcome these demands in the world of scuba is The Human Diver Project: an in-depth program developed by dive safety expert, author, and former British RAF (Royal Air Force) officer Gareth Lock.

Dive Into History Series: Part Two – Research Library Essentials

Article and photos courtesy Erik Petkovic In the introduction to my latest book, Lake Erie Technical Wreck Diving Guide, I wrote the...

DCDiveShow Launches Guest Line Up for Polar Regions Presentation

In recognition of the world’s climate changing, particularly how these changes affect oceans and polar ice caps, the DC Dive Show will focus on polar regions during its featured presentation. Scheduled for Saturday, February 22, 2020 at 2pm EST, the exploratory showcase will feature two of scuba diving’s most prolific polar explorers, who have explored the region for many years: Jill Heinerth, who was the first diver to cave dive within an iceberg; and Amos Nachoum, the first to photograph polar bears from underwater.

Bubbles Below Resurfaces

Article by John Tapley; photos courtesy Bud Gray In July of 2015, Bubbles Below, a mainstay in the...

Cauayan: Diving the Rock

By Eco-Photo Explorers : Michael Salvarezza and Christopher P. Weaver The Sulu Sea in the Philippines is home...

Commercial Diving – Pipe Dreams

By Mark Norder Out running some errands when my phone rings and I see my boss’s name on...

Overtourism – Is it Hurting Dive Tourism?

Story by Bonnie McKenna Have you ever returned to a place where, a couple of years earlier,...

Tech Tips: Does Your BCD Fill with Water?

This particular viewer asked, “My BCD fills with water. Is that normal?” Yeah. That’s normal. BCDs fill with water and that’s the way it is. Let me explain, first of all, why they fill with water; and secondly, if you’re getting a lot of water – maybe too much of it – maybe there’s something you can do about it.

Vintage Scuba: What is Your Regulator’s Name?

As you saw from the title, we’re talking about names of your regulator. I don’t know if you have a name for your regulator: a lot of the regulators I’ve owned over years, I’ve had names for them. I can’t repeat those names because this is in the public domain - I didn’t have any called “Love” or “Deary”. The reason they had names was because the regs from manufacturers often had names prior to about 1975. They don’t today. If you have an APEKS XT-4 that’s not a name: that’s a brand or a model number. An Aqualung D200: that’s not a name.

Whale of a Tale: Return to the S.S. Northern Pacific

Modest events can cast your life. I took my beginner scuba class in the late ‘60s in Rockville, Maryland with local dive club called the Atlantis Rangers. While waiting for class to start, I overheard some local divers discussing the recent discovery of two New Jersey shipwrecks. One was the S.S. Northern Pacific that sank in fire in 1922, and the other was a U.S. Navy destroyer called the Jacob Jones. The Jacob Jones was torpedoed off Cape May, New Jersey on February 28, 1942. Less than 26 years later, in 1968, two Pennsylvania divers, John Dudas and Bill Scheibel dived off the fishing party boat “Big Jim” discovering both wrecks in one day. I made a mental note that I wanted to someday also explore those wrecks. I would earn that opportunity a few years later.
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